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Glasses….Crutches….One and The Same

Glasses….Crutches….One and The Same

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Last Reviewed: May 1, 2019

Professionally Reviewed by
Mark Bushby
Optometrist

And right now you might think that I’m a bit crazy. You obviously can’t put crutches on your face or glasses under your arms to lean on while you walk. However, they both do the same thing. They keep your muscles from working.

When you injure your ankle, you use crutches to help you walk without using the muscles around the injury. While the injury is healing, the muscles are becoming weaker. Once you are able to walk without crutches, you need to go to physical therapy to strengthen the muscles that have weakened during the healing period.

And right now you might think that I’m a bit crazy. You obviously can’t put crutches on your face or glasses under your arms to lean on while you walk. However, they both do the same thing. They keep your muscles from working.

When you injure your ankle, you use crutches to help you walk without using the muscles around the injury. While the injury is healing, the muscles are becoming weaker. Once you are able to walk without crutches, you need to go to physical therapy to strengthen the muscles that have weakened during the healing period.

The same is true for your eyes. Once you notice a problem with your vision, you go to the optometrist and usually glasses or contacts are prescribed. You start wearing them and right away, your eyes don’t have to work so hard to see.  Now you might think this is great. WRONG!

Your eyes are going to become as dependent on your glasses as your ankle was on your crutches.  The muscles around your eyes will eventually become so weak that you won’t be able to see clear without glasses.

Is there physical therapy for your eyes? Yes there is. Eye exercises are just as effective as any other muscle exercises.  And they can keep you from having to wear glasses and weaken your eyesight.

Glasses Crutches One And The Same
Optometrist

Professionally Reviewed by
Mark Bushby
Optometrist

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  • Higher intake of riboflavin and niacin were related to a lower risk of glaucoma. Overall, lower intake of niacin remained significantly associated with glaucoma also in the subgroup analysis.
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