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Why Did You Get Eye Problems In The First Place?

Why Did You Get Eye Problems In The First Place?

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Last Reviewed: May 1, 2019

Professionally Reviewed by
Dr. Gary L. Bodiford
Ophthalmologist

Professionally Reviewed by
Dr. Andrew Simon
Chiropractor

Professionally Reviewed by
Dr. Jonathan Kaplan
Psychologist

"Why Did I Get Eye Problems In The First Place?"

Great question!

Is it genetic? Is it because you read too much? Is it because you don't use enough light at night? Or is it because of computers?

Science can't find a connection to genetics. Any research study into that direction shows the opposite. Within the same gene pool, other factors cause eye problems.

So it's not because your parents have it. Or because "it runs in the family"...

Reading, light, and computers also didn't prove to be a factor. There isn't a study available that connects computer use, reading, or bad light to eye problems.

Yet, whenever a study is done to research one of these aspects, another factor comes up:

Lifestyle!

Stress, diet, and posture continue to show definite reasons. So when we talk about hereditary eye conditions, it's more the habits we inherit than the genes.

You see, before you were even three years old, all you did was observing your parents. Everybody does the same. It's called modelling.

In that age bracket, we have no conscious faculties in our mind to analyze if our parents' habits are serving them or not.

That's where the "oh, you are just like your mom" or "you are just like your dad" comes from. We take on the way we deal with stress. We model their posture. And we like the foods they like, just because they do.

And that is the key to inheriting eye conditions.

But the other factor is much harder to detect. Your optic nerve enters right into your emotional brain. It's the Old Brain that doesn't think. It's only concerned with your survival.

Because of that, every eye problem has an emotional pattern attached to it. Some are fear of the future. Others are resentment of the past. Or dwelling on the should have's and could have's in life.

And then there is a dislike of the self. With some eye conditions you just try to avoid seeing an aspect of yourself, you are not happy about.

Now go back to the time you got your first pair of glasses. The day that you found out that you have eye problems.

Go another two years back. Within that time frame, within these two years, analyze what happened to you emotionally. What was upsetting to you? How did you get hurt?

That's the true starting point of your eye problem!

Whatever eye condition you have, there is an emotional underlying reason for it. Uncover that, and you at least know what to work with.

Of course, that's something we do in-depth in the Pure Vision Method™...

Does this make sense? If not, ask questions in a comment below.

If yes, let me know if you can pinpoint that moment in your life.

Eye Surgeon

Professionally Reviewed by
Dr. Gary L. Bodiford
Ophthalmologist

Chiropractor

Professionally Reviewed by
Dr. Andrew Simon
Chiropractor

Psychologist

Professionally Reviewed by
Dr. Jonathan Kaplan
Psychologist

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  • Higher intake of riboflavin and niacin were related to a lower risk of glaucoma. Overall, lower intake of niacin remained significantly associated with glaucoma also in the subgroup analysis.
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